London fire: Government staff drafted to help victims


London fire: Government staff drafted to help victims

Metropolitan Police Commander Stuart Cundy said five people had been formally identified and the rest were "sadly" missing presumed dead.

NHS England said 18 patients remain in hospital after the fire, including nine who are in critical care.

A senior United Kingdom government minister said Sunday that he believed the cladding apparently used in a recent refurbishment of the London high-rise devastated by a blaze is banned in Britain for buildings above a certain height.

His friend Abdel Aziz nods in agreement, before venting at the time it has taken to identify the bodies that have been recovered so far.

Children who attended Catholic schools in the shadow of Grenfell Tower are among about 76 people who have yet to be accounted for.

They demanded justice for the victims and claimed Wednesday's fatal blaze was due to negligence, with many citing the new cladding put on the 1974 concrete tower.

"We must also prepare people for the awful reality that some people may not be identified due to the intensity of the fire", he added.

Mr King, who is secretary of the all-party parliamentary group on fire safety, also said ministers failed to insist that sprinkler systems be mandatory in new schools in England, despite clear recommendations in reports commissioned by the Government itself.

Prime Minister Theresa May met with victims of the disaster at Downing Street on Saturday, before declaring that the support given to families in the aftermath of the tragedy was "not good enough".

Police said they are using the INTERPOL Disaster Victim Identification Standards to identify the deceased. "What I'm now absolutely focused on is ensuring that we get that support on the ground", Mrs May said in a BBC Newsnight interview.

"In circumstances where foam plastic insulation is permitted, the insulation must meet stringent fire performance testing to limit the amount of smoke produced and slow the spread of flame, or the insulation must be protected by non-combustible material", Cripps said in an email.

The 91-year-old monarch said that Britain remains "resolute in the face of adversity" after the horrendous fire and recent extremist attacks in London and Manchester.

In an interview on Friday, she sidestepped questions on whether she had misread the public mood.

Hundreds have been left homeless by the blaze, putting more pressure on officials in a city already plagued by a chronic housing shortage.

"The government must properly resource any inquiry so it can report as quickly as possible", he said.

There is also a minute's silence planned at 11am on Monday to remember the victims.

Fire safety experts believe that cladding put on the building's exterior during a renovation previous year was less fire retardant, which may have fueled the blaze. British officials have ordered a review of other buildings that have had similar renovations.

Anger boiled over on Friday as people stormed Kensington & Chelsea Town Hall.

He said: "Within the community, trust in the authorities is falling through the floor and a suspicion of a cover-up is rising".

The statement comes as Transport for London partially closed two Tube lines because of London Fire Brigade (LFB) saying there was a "short-term risk of some debris falling on to the tracks".

Many survivors are sleeping on the floor in community centers and there's still no coordinated distribution of donated food and clothing.

The devastating fire erupted in the early hours of June 14 trapping several sleeping residents at the 24-storey Grenfell tower. They say their complaints were ignored.