ECONOMICS >Britain says will not stay in European Union via 'back door'


ECONOMICS >Britain says will not stay in European Union via 'back door'

However the outspoken pro-European finance minister Philip Hammond and ardent Brexiteer trade minister Liam Fox looked to end the debate by setting out a joint position in a newspaper article.

The government says it hopes to persuade the 27 other European Union nations to start negotiating a "deep and special" future relationship that would include a free trade deal between Britain and the EU.

They write that there will be a "time-limited" transition period that would "further our national interest and give business greater certainty", but insist that Brexit will not be halted.

The third round of negotiations is due to start on August 28. And it must ensure a smooth and predictable pathway for businesses and citizens alike.

The series of publications will also include papers on the future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union - highlighting the U.K.'s view that so-called "exit issues" such as the Brexit bill and the Northern Irish border, which the European Union has insisted must be settled first, are inextricably linked to future relationship issues, which the European Union has said it will only discuss once "sufficient progress" has been reached in talks. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said last week that Brexit advocates "already had 14 months" to issue detailed proposals, but had not. Barnier has expressed concern that the first two rounds have failed to produce clarity on the key issues and that there was "a clock ticking" towards the date in 2019 when Britain would be out of the bloc.

A graph showing attitudes towards immigration
BuzzFeedRemain and Leave voters agree on a number of major Brexit issues

Prime Minister Theresa May then called a snap election in an attempt to increase her Conservative Party's majority in Parliament and strengthen her negotiating hand.

After the last round of negotiations, Michel Barnier, the EU's chief negotiator, was highly critical of Britain's lack of preparedness, as he announced there had been no breakthrough.

Mr Miliband, who narrowly lost out to his brother Ed in the 2010 Labour leadership contest and who now heads the International Rescue Committee relief agency in NY, described the outcome of the 2016 referendum as an "unparalleled act of economic self-harm".

In recent weeks, with May on her summer vacation, members of her Cabinet have openly disagreed about what direction Brexit should take.

"We've been crystal clear that issues around our withdrawal and our future partnership are inextricably linked, and the negotiations so far have reinforced that view", the Department for Exiting the European Union said in the statement released Sunday.