Oxford proposes banning diesel and petrol vehicles from city centre


Oxford proposes banning diesel and petrol vehicles from city centre

The zero emission zone proposals would see: non-zero emission taxis, cars, light commercial vehicles and buses excluded from Queen Street, Cornmarket Street, New Inn Hall Street, Market Street, Ship Street and St Michael's Street from 2020.

Oxford City Council and Oxfordshire County Council have jointly proposed the establishment of a Zero Emission Zone in Oxford City by banning petrol and diesel vehicles ban from parts of the city centre.

The full Zero Emission Zone Feasibility and Implementation Study is available on the Oxford City Council website, and the public consultation will be available from Monday 16 October. The Oxford ZEZ is part of the larger plan throughout the country created to tackle illegal levels of air pollution; many streets in Oxford are past the legal limit set by the European Union for Nitrogen Dioxide.

Tanner said that George Street, one of the city's main commercial arteries, could see NO2 levels drop by as much as 74 percent.

The Councils are taking other measures to help residents and visitors lower emissions.

Oxford is the first council to introduce plans of this nature, though the council has said that the proposals are "contingent on technology being sufficiently developed to allow this to be practical". By 2025 another eight streets will be added, including Oxford's busiest road, George Street.

"All of us who drive or use petrol or diesel vehicles through Oxford are contributing to the city's toxic air".

The city council has already begun to prepare for the Zero Emissions Zone, having secured £500,000 of Government funding to install charging points for electric taxis and a further £800,000 to install 100 EV charging points for regular motorists.

“Everyone needs to do their bit – from national government and local authorities to businesses and residents – to end this public health emergency.”. Other schemes such as reduced parking fees for EVs and electric delivery vehicle-only loading areas are under consideration, the City Council said. Everyone who uses Oxford centre has the right to breathe clean air.

However, as the plans are due to be gradually rolled out over 18 years, the council has pointed out that there's plenty of time to budget, with the majority of the cost taken up by the second half of the plan.

Meanwhile, Transport for London is planning to introduce the world's first Ultra Low Emission Zone in September 2020.