Kenya Bans Street Protests Amid Election Row


Kenya Bans Street Protests Amid Election Row

Odinga said that based on a 2013 Supreme Court ruling, Kenya's Independent Electoral Boundaries Commission (IEBC) now had 90 days to accept new nominations following his withdrawal this week from the rerun against President Uhuru Kenyatta.

Kenya's supreme court nullified the presidential election in August, citing procedural irregularities and voiding the victory of President Uhuru Kenyatta. Odinga's decision is likely to set the stage for more court battles, while deepening a political crisis that has also led to an economic slowdown.

Kenyatta insists an October 26 do-over must go ahead.

But in an interview in London, Odinga told the AP he's willing to return if that changes.

On Wednesday, the election board said the polls would be held as planned and all eight of the original candidates would be on the ballot. However the country still has grim memories of the perils of post-election violence, with a disputed 2007 poll sparking politically-motivated tribal clashes that left some 1,100 dead.

Members of Parliament aligned to Jubilee Party, who are the majority in the House, passed the laws on Wednesday, October 11, before passing it to their Senate counterparts who passed it without making any changes and sent it back to the Speaker of the National Assembly. "One thing is for sure, the country is entering uncharted waters and walking the path to the unknown", the Daily Nation said in an editorial.

The standoff over the elections has sparked demonstrations, but the numbers of protesters has tended to be in the hundreds rather than the thousands.

Kenyan police have shot dead two people and wounded a third when a crowd tried to storm a police station during an opposition protest against a looming presidential vote re-run, a senior official says.

The demonstrations defied a new government ban on opposition protests in the central business districts of Kenya's three largest cities, while concerns rose again about election-related violence in East Africa's largest economy.

Matiang'i said the ban was not meant to curtail the constitutional right to demonstrate but that it was agreed on after security authorities found that there was "imminent danger".

"The government sending the police to stop the people by throwing teargas and using live bullets, they are basically violating the fundamental rights of the people ..."

"(The government) are talking about a benevolent dictatorship - we can assure them that the people of Kenya will not take it lying down", Odinga said.