Nancy Pelosi: GOP Using National Reciprocity to Arm 'Violent Criminals'


Nancy Pelosi: GOP Using National Reciprocity to Arm 'Violent Criminals'

Fairfax, Va.-The National Rifle Association applauded the United States House of Representatives on Wednesday for passing the most far-reaching expansion of self-defense rights in modern American history. the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017 passed with bipartisan support in a 231-198 vote.

In a statement, Stefanik said that 2nd amendment rights "don't disappear when we cross state lines".

The bill was also paired with an initiative to better report legal and mental health records to the background check system, an effort to win over Democrats.

The bill's proponents say the gun owners' licenses should be honored the same way that a driver's license in one state is honored in other states.

A copy of FPC's written testimony regarding the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act and the Fix NICS Act passed by the House today can be viewed or downloaded at http://passhr38.com, where gun owners who wish to send letters to Congress may use FPC's free Grassroots Action Tools. This bill will give law-abiding citizens the ability to protect themselves when traveling across state lines, a significant step forward in exercising our Second Amendment rights.

"Even the most careful and knowledgeable concealed carry permit holders find it hard to navigate the current maze of state and local concealed carry laws", Rep. Richard Hudson (R-NC), author of the bill, said. We wish to thank Congressman Richard Hudson for his bold and courageous leadership on this issue, as well as every House member who co-sponsored and voted for this important measure to protect and advance constitutional rights. "But the person must be eligible to possess a firearm under federal law in the first place, meaning that they are not a felon, dangerously mentally ill, a domestic abuser or have any other disqualifying factors for legally carrying a firearm".

In the Senate, Democrats have said the combination bill is a non-starter, and senior Republicans have said that pairing the bills could torpedo them both. But critics of the bill say it undermines each individual state's ability to set its own requirements for issuing those permits.

A similar bill is now pending in the Senate Judiciary Committee. "Marylanders convicted of violent crimes are not allowed to carry concealed weapons on our streets, but the CCRA would allow violent criminals from other states to do so here".