Feds Identify Suspect in CIA Hacking Tools Leak


Feds Identify Suspect in CIA Hacking Tools Leak

On Friday, Manhattan federal prosecutor Matthew Laroche estimated in court that charges against Schulte are 45 days away. The U.S government has identified a suspect in the leak. He argues dozens of people had access to the server. His attorneys have also denied he had any involvement in the Vault 7 leak.

Schulte's name was first reported Tuesday by The Washington Post.

Schulte's defense attorney said in court that the government's reasoning used to obtain search warrants for Schulte's property were "just flat inaccurate and not true".

US federal prosecutor Matthew Laroche detailed the investigation during a January 8, 2018 hearing in a NY federal courtroom. That includes the fact they he is believed to have used software called Tor, which allows users to communicate and transmit information over the Internet anonymously, and the fact he was planning a vacation to Cancun, Mexico.

The report says that, while the government thinks Schulte was the one who handed the cache of documents over to WikiLeaks, they do not now have enough evidence to bring charges.

Schultz, of NY, now is detained at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan.

He has plead not guilty to the charges.

A former federal prosecutor who is not connected to the case said that it is not unusual to hold a suspect in one crime on unrelated charges and that the months Schulte has spent in jail do not necessarily mean the government's case has hit a wall.

Here's where things get tricky: the government says it does not have enough evidence to charge Schulte with the leak. Prosecutors say he had a cache of it on a server he maintained. He was in the CIA for the development of a computer code to the intelligence of foreign adversaries.

At the time of the leak, people who had worked with that group said that suspicion had mainly focused on contractors, not full-time Central Intelligence Agency employees such as Schulte. No charges have been filed against Schulte in that investigation, and his defense lawyers have insisted he was not involved.

Schulte said in the statement that he joined the intelligence community to fulfill what he saw as a patriotic duty to respond to the attacks of September 11, 2001. The statement said he later reported "incompetent management and bureaucracy" at the CIA to the agency's inspector general and a congressional oversight committee. This, he alleges, made him appear as a disgruntled employee when he left the spy agency in 2016.

"Due to these unfortunate coincidences the Federal Bureau of Investigation ultimately made the snap judgment that I was guilty of the leaks and targeted me", Schulte said.

Since he's been jailed, Schulte has created a Facebook page where he posts articles criticizing the criminal justice system.