White House's Navarro apologizes for 'special place in hell' comment


White House's Navarro apologizes for 'special place in hell' comment

Bruce Heyman, the former U.S. Ambassador to Canada, on Monday slammed Donald Trump's treatment of Justin Trudeau, and Canada in general, demanding the president apologize for his surrogate's claim there's a "special place in hell" for people like the Canadian prime minister. "We make commitments and keep them".

"Canada does not conduct its diplomacy through ad hominem attacks ... and we refrain particularly from ad hominem attacks when it comes from a close ally", Ms Freeland told reporters in Quebec City on Sunday.

"If the United States decides to apply new tariffs, Canada will be ready", the official said.

The president said that Canada, Mexico and the European Union have taken advantage of an global trading system, benefiting from low US tariffs while imposing high trade barriers of their own.

Trump responded to Trudeau in posts on Twitter Saturday, accusing the prime minister of making "false statements" and calling him "very dishonest" and "weak".

"We support the continuing efforts by the president on North Korea, (and) we look forward to looking at the details of the agreement", Trudeau said.

And he confirmed that Canada would press ahead with dollar-for-dollar retaliatory tariffs on July 1 as previously announced. Trump tweeted on Saturday. "That was a mistake".

-Canada trade dispute following the weekend's G7 summit. Addressing reporters in Singapore ahead of Trump's summit Tuesday with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Pompeo said he was "unconcerned" that Trump's treatment of Canada - a close ally - boded poorly for his ability to forge peace with a longtime US adversary.

Asked if these were statements from the President, Navarro said they were his words, but that they reflected "the sentiment that was on Air Force One".

"Let me correct a mistake I made", White House economic advisor Peter Navarro was quoted as saying at a Washington event organized by The Wall Street Journal. "We used fact-based arguments". "I know it didn't look friendly; it was reported as nasty both ways, I was angry with her - actually, we were just talking, the whole group, unrelated to everything, very friendly, waiting for the document to come back".

Canadian politicians of all stripes have rallied around Trudeau, unanimously passing a motion Monday supporting the prime minister and denouncing Trump's personal attacks on him. But more importantly, he should apologize to the Canadian public. For the message, the White House is most definitely not sorry. Significant foreign investment in Canada is also linked to its access to the U.S. market.

Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr said Canada has worked hard for decades to establish good relations with the USA and "we have no interest in turning up the heat".

Freeland said Canada's approach to the trade talks remains unchanged: to work for a win-win-win compromise while being "absolutely resolute in defence of the national interest". "I don't understand the obsession with trade relations with Canada", he said on Fox's "Sunday Morning Futures", given that Canada is the biggest single buyer of American goods and services in the world.