3 things to know about net neutrality's end


3 things to know about net neutrality's end

To announce the repeal of net neutrality protections and the new "Restoring Internet Freedom Order" taking effect on Monday, Ajit Pai wrote an op-ed today repeating what he has already said in the past: Title II classification was heavy-handed; FTC should be responsible for consumer protections, and that the system fine worked for decades before these new protections came into place.

The new internet rules came into effect on Monday in the USA after Federal Communications Commission (FCC) repealed the 2015 Obama administration's much publicised net neutrality rules in December by a 3-2 vote.

Pai's FCC has eliminated rules that prohibited Internet service providers from blocking or throttling lawful Internet traffic.

The Federal Communications Commission's repeal of net neutrality rules took effect today.

"If certain services are blocked or throttled, they get it", Mr. Doyle said. This is how the term "net neutrality" was coined - the idea was that every bit is the same and that ISPs can't charge differentiated prices based on different types of services. "Our transparency rule will also help ensure that any problematic conduct by Internet service providers is quickly identified and corrected".

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who spearheaded the deregulatory move, says the repeal will improve broadband service. Internet service providers are required only to publish information about how they manage their networks. Many ISPs say they are waiting to see what happens with the proposed Net Neutrality rules. He says that net neutrality, passed in 2015, "depressed investment in building and expanding broadband networks and deterred innovation". And states like NY have signed executive orders to keep net neutrality in place.

With net neutrality rules gone, AT&T and Verizon can give priority to their own movies and TV shows, while hurting rivals such as Amazon, YouTube and startups yet to be born.

The Obama-era federal regulations known as net neutrality are done - at least for now.

"The gutting of net neutrality is a symbol of our broken democracy", said Evan Greer, deputy director of Fight For the Future, in a statement Monday.

"I think ultimately it's going to mean better, faster, cheaper internet access and more competition", Pai told the Washington Post.

However, companies are likely to drop these self-imposed restrictions; they will just wait until people aren't paying a lot of attention, said Marc Martin, a former FCC staffer who is now chairman of communications practice at the law firm Perkins Coie.

These are set to replaced by a set of lighter-touch regulations passed months ago.

MI is not one of them. Others point out that the FTC, which oversees consumer protection for every corner of the USA economy, already has its hands full. "They just don't want to own the fact that they want to change this", Miller said.

In the meantime, some ISPs have promised in the absence of the federal net neutrality rules to not slow data or block it, and with state laws in flux and a federal showdown possible, it's unlikely any would push the envelope at present.