Perseid meteor shower: how to see shooting stars this weekend


Perseid meteor shower: how to see shooting stars this weekend

One of the best shooting-star shows of the year (at least in the northern hemisphere) is upon us again with the arrival of the Perseid meteor shower.

Cooke says if you plan on watching the show, just relax, look up and enjoy the meteor show. Unfortunately, there's always the chance that bad weather like fog or rain will create unfavorable viewing conditions.

"The average particle size is that of large sand grain but some small pea gravel-size meteors can cause bright fireballs that light up the sky and ground", he continued.

The Perseids, which are the most famous summer meteors, will reach peak on Sunday 12th August up to early hours of Monday 13th August.

"Comets are spectacular and lovely and take months to go across the sky but every time they go near the sun they are melted down a little bit".

And while they take his name, the meteors don't actually come from the stars in the Perseus constellation, which are hundreds of light-years away.

The moon won't be making an appearance this weekend, instead about 50 meteorites per hour will light up the sky offering star gazers a dazzling show between midnight and dawn. That's fewer than the 150-200 meteors per hour that can be seen in years when the shower is in outburst, but will likely still make for quite the show. If the night is clear and you keep your eyes peeled, you should be able to see the showers at any point at night.

All you'll really need to do is crane your head upwards.

Active Junky, which is also the sister site of Space.com, has provided a list of the nation's top cities, and the best places they can go to watch the meteor show. So if you can find a spot away from artificial light and free of clouds, you will be in for a great show! The Slooh observatory will host a livestream of the shower starting at 5 p.m. ET on Sunday.

If you'd rather watch the Perseid meteor shower from the comfort of your own home, the Virtual Telescope Project is live broadcasting the shower from scenic Castel Santa Maria, Italy, beginning at 4:30 p.m. EST on August 12.

Meteor showers are typically visible with the naked eye, and so no special equipment is needed (Photo: Shutterstock)How regular will the meteors be?