Health

Can't shake the man flu

Can't shake the man flu

His study , published in the December 11 issue of the journal BMJ , finds that men suffered more severe symptoms than women and that women's hormones may soften the blow of the illness. His research points to men having weaker immune systems than women, which leads to more intense bouts of sickness. Interestingly enough, Sue found out that men indeed experience worse cold symptoms than women.


United Nations warns of severe health risks from electronic waste in India

United Nations warns of severe health risks from electronic waste in India

The authors estimate that only 20% of all e-waste was recycled , despite it containing large quantities of reusable materials such as gold, silver, copper, platinum and palladium. Notes the report: "Having a national e-waste management regime in place does not always correspond to enforcement and setting the measurable collection and recycling targets essential for effective policies".


Baby girl survives being born with heart outside chest

Baby girl survives being born with heart outside chest

Vanellope has since undergone two additional surgeries, one to remove the supporting tube and another to place her heart behind the skin of her chest wall. Glenfield Hospital/University Hospitals of Leicester/NHS TrustVanellope was born with her heart located outside her chest. "I had seen one in fetal life around 20 years ago but that pregnancy was ended", said cardiologist, Frances Bu Lock.


'tis the season to count birds!

'tis the season to count birds!

Don't forget the Great Backyard Bird Count! Everyone is welcome to participate in the count, including beginning birders to experts. More than 100 years ago, it was a Christmas tradition in some parts of North America to go outside and shoot as many birds as possible.


Glowing plants: Are you ready to switch on the bedside shrub?

Glowing plants: Are you ready to switch on the bedside shrub?

Glowing plants might sound like the stuff of science fiction - but a team of MIT researchers just grew a crop of watercress that emits emit dim light for nearly four hours. As reported in Nano Letters , the researchers used the enzyme luciferase, which works in conjunction with co-enzyme A to cause a molecule called luciferin to emit light.