Health

Aducanumab Granted Fast Track Status for Early Alzheimer's Disease

Aducanumab Granted Fast Track Status for Early Alzheimer's Disease

Scientists hailed the breakthrough as the best news in dementia research for a quarter of a century and others said that it could be a "game changer". Aducanumab is now being assessed in two global Phase 3 studies, which are created to evaluate its safety and efficacy in slowing cognitive impairment and the progression of disability in people with early AD.



FDA nixes 19 antibacterial handwash ingredients

Many antibacterial soaps contain triclosan, an ingredient that has also been added to clothing, kitchenware, furniture, and toys, increasing exposure to the chemical over a lifetime. "There's no reason to put potentially harmful chemicals in products people use every single day on their hands, faces and bodies". "Hand sanitizer on a shelf at a pharmacy in Plano, Texas.Under current regulations, manufacturers can make broad claims about their products" effectiveness in killing germs.


Kentucky Obesity Rate is 5th Highest in Nation, New Study Finds

Kentucky Obesity Rate is 5th Highest in Nation, New Study Finds

The 2016 State of Obesity Report is funded by Trust for America's Health , a nonprofit, non-partisan organization advocating for community health and disease prevention, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation , a philanthropy organization focused on health.



Florida finds Zika in trapped mosquitoes, 1st in US mainland

They say the infected person is a non-pregnant woman who was traveling to an area with on-going Zika transmission by mosquitoes. Meanwhile, Malaysia today reported its first case of Zika virus infection. Intensive trapping and testing is continuing across the region. A pregnant woman was among the victims, they said. Local authorities are also encouraging members of the public to use a mobile application device called OneService - which was set up to give feedback on municipal issues - ...



U.N. Health Officials Warn Gonorrhea Is Becoming Untreatable

Chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis are all caused by bacteria and are generally curable with antibiotics. The WHO said that 78 million people contract gonorrhea annually. In some cases, doctors are using combinations of antibiotics to cure gonorrhea, but Toedora Wi, also with WHO's Department of Reproductive Health and Research, tells Science that in order to adequately treat gonorrhea, "We will have to have new drugs in 5 years, I think".