Technology


Microsoft patches Windows XP and Server 2003 due to WannaCrypt attacks

The assault, which began Friday and was being described as the biggest-ever cyber ransom attack, struck state agencies and major companies around the world - from Russian banks and British hospitals to FedEx and European auto factories. In Russia, where a wide array of systems came under attack, officials said services had been restored or the virus contained. NHS Digital said the attack "was not specifically targeted at the NHS and is affecting organizations from across a range of sectors".



Microsoft Adds New Protection for Ransomware Amid Global Cyber Attack

This is screengrab taken from the website of the East and North Hertfordshire NHS trust as Britain's National Health Service is investigating "an issue with IT" Friday May 12, 2017. Although it won't do any good for machines that have already been hit. But it appears to be "low-level" stuff, Eisen said Saturday, given the amount of ransom demanded - $300 at first, rising to $600 before it destroys files hours later.



'Perfect storm' of conditions helped global 'WannaCry' cyberattack succeed

They asked patients not to come to the hospitals unless it was an emergency. When employees tried to access the computers, they were presented with a demand for $300 in bitcoin, a classic ransomware tactic. Major global companies said they also came under attack. In 2016, Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in California said it had paid a $17,000 ransom to regain control of its computers from hackers.



NHS cyber attack: Criminals will be brought to justice

And those fixes will do nothing for newer systems if they aren't installed. After an emergency government meeting Saturday in London, Britain's home secretary said one in five of 248 National Health Service groups had been hit. But computers and networks that didn't update their systems were still at risk. Avast was cited by the BBC as saying that it had seen 75,000 cases of the ransomware around the world, and the tools of the cyberattack are believed to have been stolen from the U.S.


Cyber-attack threat escalating - Europol

Cyber-attack threat escalating - Europol

However, a hacker could change the code to remove the domain and try the ransomware attack again. British cybersecurity expert Graham Cluley doesn't want to blame the NSA for the attack. This one worked because of a "perfect storm" of conditions, including a known and highly risky security hole in Microsoft Windows, tardy users who did not apply Microsoft's March software fix, and malware created to spread quickly once inside university, business or government networks.