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Three US soldiers confirmed dead in Afghan insider attack

A Taliban infiltrator in the Afghan army has shot two US soldiers dead before he got killed in a return fire, Attaullah Khogyani, spokesman for the provincial government in Nangarhar told Anadolu Agency. The soldiers were shot in an "inside attack", when a member of the Afghan Security Forces opened fire on the four men. They include about 8.4 thousand American soldiers and officers who train Afghan units and act as military advisers.


Another Day, Another Bomb in Kabul

Another Day, Another Bomb in Kabul

The dead and wounded were nearly all Afghan civilians and security forces: policemen, bank clerks, cart pullers, telephone company workers. The explosion also shattered windows at the Japanese embassy. No group immediately claimed responsibility for the bombing but both the Taliban and the Islamic State group have staged large-scale attacks in the Afghan capital in the past.



Michael Bradley's stunning early goal helps US tie Mexico at Azteca

With the start, DaMarcus Beasley earns his 34th World Cup Qualifying appearance and becomes the first US player to appear in qualifiers for five different FIFA World Cups . Not sure he'd win a street fight but he'll always get stuck into a tackle, he's not afraid. What do we have to say about it?: Stars and Stripes FC has a preview of their own , while Filibuster dealt with this game from the U.S.


Labour loss still a triumph for Corbyn

Labour loss still a triumph for Corbyn

After a night of high drama across the country, May insisted her party was still in pole position to lead , despite falling short by eight seats and having to turn to Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party for backing. That being said, it's important to ask what exactly we mean by a "bad deal"? It's a long-shot, but Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn could, in theory, form a coalition of minority parties.


Security Chiefs Say They Weren't 'Pressured' by White House

Security Chiefs Say They Weren't 'Pressured' by White House

Four top USA intelligence officials told Senate investigators Wednesday that they were not at liberty to discuss certain details about President Donald Trump's actions pertaining to the Justice Department's investigation of Russian Federation.