Former FBI chief James Comey has speech interrupted by protesters


Former FBI chief James Comey has speech interrupted by protesters

Former FBI Director James Comey took the stage to give the keynote address at Howard University's convocation Friday but was immediately interrupted by a group of demonstrators from the back of the auditorium. "Sometimes they will pause briefly before telling you you're an idiot". Comey twice sought to ask to be permitted to speak, but the protesters continued chanting. Howard, a historically black college, hired Comey as a special guest lecturer. In August, Flatiron Books announced it is publishing a book by Comey, in which he will share "his never-before-told experiences from some of the highest-stakes situations of his career in the past two decades of American government", the publisher said. "I listened to you for five minutes", he said. "I love the color of my skin!"

'And at the end of a conversation, we're both smarter.

"I am pleased to welcome Mr. Comey to Howard".

The protesters never gave up, interrupting Comey over and over with shouts of 'Mic check!' in the style created by the Occupy Wall Street movement.

The group behind the demonstration is HU Resist.

Howard University was created back on March 2, 1867.

In a petition circulated by "HU Resist", a student-run organization that challenges university policies, activists argued that Comey's actions as as the head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation included the "criminalization and attempted dismantling of Black Lives Matter" and the promotion of xenophobic "characterizations" of Muslims. Media accounts of his comments referred to this as a "Ferguson effect", a reference to the 2014 fatal shooting of Michael Brown by a white police officer in Missouri. One of the group's tweets described Comey's speech as "a white man trying to silence and overshadow the voices of Black people". He's also planning on giving part-time lectures at the school. We worked hard to weed those neighborhoods by removing those who were strangling it, so that seeds could be planted to allow good things to grow and to fill that space'.