Hackers claim to have unlocked iPhone X's Face ID with a mask


Hackers claim to have unlocked iPhone X's Face ID with a mask

Soon after the launch of the iPhone X with Face ID, there were many speculations suggesting that Apple will implement the same technology in the upcoming iPhones slated to be launched next year.

A week after the iPhone X officially went on sale, the Vietnamese company Bkav have proven that facial recognition is not an effective security measure.

"The latest to fall is the claim that Face ID can not be spoofed by masks, with Apple's Phil Schiller saying the company ".worked with professional mask makers and makeup artists in Hollywood to protect against these attempts to beat Face ID. The proof of concept appears to work, as you can see in the video below. It only required roughly $150 excluding 3D printer to make this mask.

Bkav says that it had created a fake mask that is made up of different materials meant for the different parts of the face.

Like the iPhone X, the new iPad is expected to include a faster processor and a custom Apple graphics processing unit, one of the people said.

As Engadget reported, this is somewhat similar to when European hacker association Chaos Computer Club used a labour-intensive process requiring 2400 DPI photographs of a user's finger and a latex print to fool fingerprint recognition in 2013.

Apple's Face ID is supposed to be the most secure biometric security system ever put into a smartphone. But it looks like an equally big change will come in the iPad tablet series that will adopt some of the technologies that debuted on the iPhone X as well as the new "no-edge" design.

According to the firm, the recognition mechanism is not as strict as one thinks and Apple seems to rely too much on Face ID's AI.

Either way, the mask method doesn't invalidate Face ID's utility for users willing to trade a little security for a little convenience. But if you add some nefarious security researchers with a lot of spare time into the mix, things get more complicated. "It was even simpler than we ourselves had thought", Bkav said.