Man Arrested in Deadly 'Swatting' Prank Charged With Involuntary Manslaughter


Man Arrested in Deadly 'Swatting' Prank Charged With Involuntary Manslaughter

Tyler Barriss, who instigated the swatting that led police to kill an unarmed man in Wichita, Kansas in December, has been charged with involuntary manslaughter, according to Glixel, as well as giving false alarm and interference with law enforcement officers.

Wichita authorities picked up Tyler Barriss, 25, from the Men's Central jail in Los Angeles at 8:53 a.m. A fugitive-from-justice warrant filed by Los Angeles County prosecutors says Barriss was charged in Kansas on December 29 with the felony of making a false alarm.

Wichita police responded to that call and confronted Andrew Finch, 28. His bond for release has been set by the court at $500,000.

Police report that Barriss made the initial emergency call, stating that he had killed his father and was holding the rest of his family hostage. Police said Finch was given commands to keep his hands raised, but he reached toward his waist multiple times before being shot.

Barriss has a history of making such hoax calls, which are sometimes called "swatting".

Bennett said that others have been identified as "potential suspects" in the case, but prosecutors are still deciding if they should face criminal charges.

There's no timeline for when a decision determining if the officer's action were reasonable will be made, he said.

Swatting is the term used by gamers when one player makes a fake 9-1-1 call and directs police to the address of a person who may have offended them in an online game. For that reason, the investigation remains ongoing and the charges against Barriss could be modified.

Siegenthaler said swatting calls can put the public and officers at risk and tie up police resources.

The false call made by Barriss is believed to have been the result of an online dispute between two Call of Duty players.

Calgary tactical officers descended on the neighborhood, evacuating the surrounding area before a woman at the home also called police to warn them she believed she was the target of a fake call.