Syria strikes send 'clear message' on chemical weapons: British PM


Syria strikes send 'clear message' on chemical weapons: British PM

The Kremlin said on Wednesday that the United States had invented reports of a chemical attack in the area, and warned against the use of this as justification for increased military action.

"This evening I have authorised British armed forces to conduct co-ordinated and targeted strikes to degrade the Syrian regime's chemical weapons capability and deter their use", she said in a statement.

Professor Iain Begg, Research Fellow at the European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), told Xinhua: "A volley of bombs may help the US and its allies feel they have reacted in a timely and proportionate manner to the undoubted horror of the use by the Syrian regime of chemical weapons, but the inevitable worry will be that they have not thought through what happens next".

President Macron insisted France play a key role in the attacks, after Syria crossed the "red line" he set out in May a year ago by using chemical weaponry again.

Sturgeon said the suspected use of chemical weapons was "sickening", but warned that the latest action risked "dangerous escalation".

"We have hit a specific and limited set of targets", she said.

The Prime Minister defended her Government's decision to carry out air strikes in Syria, claiming the air strikes were in Britain's national interest.

Speaking in Downing Street, May said the military strikes should be a "warning to Russia" before holding the Syrian government accountable for the chemical attack.

Konashenkov said that Russian Federation knew "for sure" that between April 3-6, the White Helmets - a group which helps civilians in opposition-held territory in Syria - were "under severe pressure specifically from London to produce as quickly as possible this pre-planned provocation".

Britain's ambassador to the United Nations says Russia's claims are 'grotesque, freaky and a blatant lie'.

In her comments, May also alluded to a nerve agent attack in Britain last month on a former Russian spy and his daughter.

Williamson told BBC radio that all British crews returned safely and early indications were that the strikes had been "highly successful".

She said that at an emergency cabinet meeting in London on Thursday "we agreed that it was both right and legal to take military action" after hearing legal advice.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said that four RAF Tornado jets were deployed to launch missiles at a Syrian military facility.

Parliament is not due to reconvene until Monday, following its Easter recess.

Trump said strikes on Syria are under way. "This legally questionable action risks escalating further".

For his part, the leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), Gerard Batten, opposed the British military action in Syria.

Vince Cable, leader of the Liberal Democrats, said: "Riding the coattails of an erratic U.S. president is no substitute for a mandate from the House of Commons".