Net Neutrality Is Officially Gone. Here's How This Will Affect You


Net Neutrality Is Officially Gone. Here's How This Will Affect You

A statement by the pro net-neutrality group Fight for the Future declared: "June 11th will serve as the kick-off for intense campaigning focused on House lawmakers, who will be under tremendous pressure to support the [net neturality measure] ahead of the midterm elections, given that voters from across the political spectrum overwhelmingly support restoring these rules". Those rules required online service providers to treat all internet traffic the same without slowing or blocking content from competing providers. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said he wants to return to a "light-touch" regulatory framework for the internet and is kicking authority to police broadband companies over to the FTC.

The FCC voted to repeal the restrictions in December. Some consumers fear a slower Internet and higher costs for broadband delivery. If you're interested in letting your representatives know where you stand on net neutrality and how you'd like them to vote, you can see a tally of who has and hasn't agreed to support net neutrality here.

Internet service providers (ISPs) like Verizon and Comcast have a great deal of freedom over how they conduct their business. At least 29 states have introduced more than 65 bills aimed at protecting net neutrality and seven states - Hawaii, New Jersey, New York, Montana, Rhode Island, Oregon and Vermont - enacted executive orders that made it illegal for state agencies to enter contracts with ISPs that don't uphold net neutrality. His order, touted as promoting investment and broadband deployment, loosens the FCC's regulation of ISPs, and instead gives the Federal Trade Commission jurisdiction to enforce violations. The repeal will also let ISPs charge websites or online services for priority access to consumers. To commemorate the occasion, FCC chairman Ajit Pai - the man mainly responsible for the repeal of Net Neutrality - penned an op-ed piece for CNET in which he champions the dissolution of internet regulations. It will head to the State Assembly, where hearings will begin in June and must be voted on by the end of August. Congress could step in if several states pass their own legislation, and given the Republican majority, advocates for net neutrality are skeptical about the outcome.

The FTC would theoretically file lawsuits against ISPs that make net neutrality promises and then break them.

"Americans across the country are raising their voices against the Trump assault on the free Internet, yet House Republicans inexplicably refuse to listen to the will of the people and save net neutrality", she continued.